First Snow

The Shadorma is a poetic form consisting of a six-line stanza (or sestet). The form is alleged to have originated in Spain. Each stanza has a syllable count of three syllables in the first line, five syllables in the second line, three syllables in the third and fourth lines, seven syllables in the fifth line, and five syllables in the sixth line (3/5/3/3/7/5) for a total of 26 syllables. A poem may consist of one stanza, or an unlimited number of stanzas (a series of shadormas).

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fresh snow
I was twenty-three
ecstatic
full of joy
seeing snow for the first time
I tried to taste it

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

For: B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond – Shadorma – January 2, 2016

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Spring – B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond – A Hymn

All winter long the garden is cold and bare
With the coming of spring, everywhere is lovely
Trees unfold their leaves, flowers bloom with flair
Apples blossom, all white and pure with such beauty
And the smell of wonderful rain and freshly cut grass
Don’t forget the symphony of spring with birds singing
The spring peepers chirping call chorus with such class
The dandelions, lilacs, tulips, hyacinths, all blooming

 

For: B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond

Pasko! – B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond – Tanaga

Greetings from Paloma!

For this week I’d like us to return to the Tanaga for our inspiration.

The tanaga is a Filipino poem passed down through oral tradition. It consists of four lines with seven syllables each; the traditional rhyme scheme is AABB but modern tanagas may follow AABB, ABBB, ABAB, ABBA, AAAB, BAAA, ABCD rhyme patterns.

Ang Pasko ay sumapit
Mano po Ninong at Ninang
Pagmamahal sa mundo
Magdiwang tayong lahat

Christmas has finally come
Bless godfather and godmother
Love is for the whole world
Let’s all celebrate Christmas

(c) ladyleemanila 2015

 

For: B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond – Tanaga

Christmas Market – B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond – The Circular Poem

Hello, Bastet here for a new episode of B&P.

Today we’re going to look into one of the many variations of the Circular Poem. I first came across this variation reading a blog written at Jane Dougherty Writes a few weeks ago where Jane, a very talented poet, challenged her readers to try the form. I found it very stimulating indeed!

So the circular poem we’re going to try is Jane’s variation of the form as described here in her words:

“A circular poem is one that goes round full circle.

The last word of the first line rhymes with the first word of the following line and so on until you end up back at your first line.

Lines can be any length, it’s the rhyme that’s important.”

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Christmas market in the city
Sea of people looking around
Background of lights and decors
Stores, malt wine, stars and figures
Firs, sweets and nuts for home to bring
Meeting friends, shopping spree so precious
Christmas market in the city

Meeting friends
At Christmas market
Drinking wine
Having fun
Peaceful atmosphere today
All so valuable

 

For: B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond – The Circular Poem and Share A Little Bit Of Christmas Spirit

B&P Shadorma & Beyond – The Hay(na)ku

Hello World, this is Bastet presenting another poetic form.

As you can see by our title, the form I’m presenting is called ‘The Hay(na)ku‘ and it’s a fairly recently created form (2003) by poet Eileen Tabios (born 1960) an award-winning Filipino-American poet and writer well known for her prose poetry. The Hay(na)ku has become pretty well-known in poetic circles (The name “hay(na)ku” was coined by Vince Gotera).

With a name like hay(na)ku, we know that we’re into micro-poetry and this is just about as micro as you can get! It’s a tercet with just 6 words – line one is one word, line two – two words and line three – three words. That’s it. There’s no syllable count or rhyming requirements etc.

 

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Ladylee
Him Indoors
Together we live

A cosy home
In Bavaria
Blissful

Love
Is everywhere
Keeping us warm

My sweetheart
To love and cherish
No one else
Only you
Looking forward to old age
Together for love

(and now in Filipino)

Ikaw
At ako
Hanggang sa huli

Hirap at ginhawa
Kapiling ka
Mahal

(c) ladyleemanila 2015

For: B&P Shadorma & Beyond

B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond – The Twenty-Eight

Greetings from Paloma!

For this week we will look at the shadorma once again (a non-rhyming form in 3/5/3/3/7/5 syllables) and the Twenty Eight, created by J. Lapis of Dark Light Harbor.

The Twenty Eight

Form

Four lines with seven syllables each;
end-rhyme the first and fourth line (optional).

Alternate Form

Seven lines with four syllables each

 

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fun and camaraderie

sharing a meal and some wine

updating news with each one

face lit up with joy and glee

 

oh what a day

lunch together

treasure each friend

fun and laughter

joy and natter

the sky is blue

a gorgeous day

 

together

life could be such fun

you and me

him and her

sharing a sumptuous meal

lovely to see all

 

(c) ladyleemanila 2015

 

For: B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond – The Twenty-Eight

Lest We Forget – B&P Shadorma and Beyond – The Bop

Today we’re going to look into a fairly recently created poetic form called The Bop. It was created by poet Afaa Michael Weaver, an American poet (born in 1951, author of several collections of poems and a full length play) during a summer retreat of the African-American poetry organization Cave Canem.

It’s not totally dissimilar to a sonnet … it consists of three un-rhymed stanzas with a repeated refrain after each stanza.

The first stanza is dedicated to the statement of a problem and it is 6 lines long.

The second stanza is dedicated to the elaboration of the problem and it is 8 lines long.

The third stanza is dedicated to the possible solution of the problem and it is also 6 lines long.

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How do we remember the men we’ve lost?
How can we tell them they’re still being missed?
That every day, especially on this crisp autumn day
Their memories still linger and they’re not forgotten
That what they’ve done are truly appreciated
Would wearing poppies and lighting candles do?

Lest we forget, lest we forget

Men of valour and courage going to war
Every generation, there are some reasons
Of why men waged wars against each other
We send them there, some still boys and girls
Not knowing whether they’d still come back
The experience they’ve got, we don’t really know
And when they come back, are they still whole?
Our heroes, our loved ones, their sacrifices

Lest we forget, lest we forget

And so we remember them
We appreciate what they’ve done
To our countries and to our freedom
Wars are ugly, wars are unfair and wars are ruthless
But then they are necessary sometimes
Let’s just hope that peace and understanding come

Lest we forget, lest we forget

For: B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond

B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond – The Lento, Revisited

A Lento consists of two quatrains with a fixed rhyme scheme of
abcb, defe;

All the FIRST words of each verse should rhyme.

There is no fixed syllable structure to the Lento, but keeping a good,
flowing rhythm is recommended.

a-witch-prepares

Which witch prepares a spell?
Switch that man to a frog
Ditched her for that barmaid
Twitch of sting felt for that dog

Feeling at last the problem’s solved
Bring some justice to her fate
Zing was added to her lacklustre life
Chuckling to herself, she feels great

Hallow’s Eve
Or Allhalloween
All Saint’s Eve
Trick or Treat
Costume parties, bonfires, pranks
Light candles on graves

(c) ladyleemanila 2015

For: B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond

Lady Godiva – B&P Shadorma and Beyond – The Trinet

Bastet wrote: One of those forms is the Trinet, and I’m afraid I really don’t remember who introduced it. It’s not particularly difficult … it’s just 7 lines with word counts of 2,2,6,6,2,2,2 – however anyone who’s ever done a micro poem knows that tiny does not mean simple!

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Lady Godiva
nude ride
clothed only in her long hair
Peeping Tom bored a hole and
saw her
no tax
for folks

(c) Ladyleemanila 2015

For: B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond

Peacock – B&P Shadorma and Beyond – The Oddquain

An oddquain is a short, usually unrhymed poem with seventeen syllables in five lines: 1, 3, 5, 7, 1.
It was created by Glenda L. Hand. The oddquain may stand alone, or it may be combined / modified as follows:

Oddquain Sequences – a longer poem made of several oddquains;

Crown Oddquain – a series of five oddquains;

Reverse Oddquain – an oddquain with a reverse pattern of 1-7-5-3-1;

Oddquain Butterfly – a nine-line stanza with 1-3-5-7-1-7-5-3-1.

Kew 9

Why
The peacock’s
On the other side
Feasibly she’s waiting there
Love
He wants to show his feathers
Radiant coloured spots
Glimmering
Bright

(c) ladyleemanila 2015

For: B&P’s Shadorma & Beyond